Category: Uncategorized

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I Promessi Sposi, Part II: Alessandro Manzoni

Manzoni This, then, is a bit of the world in which Manzoni lived and played a prominent part.  He was born  in Milan.  His father Pietro Manzoni came from a decayed feudal family and had  had married Giulia, the daughter of the liberal legal reformer Cesare Beccaria, whose tissue of cliches on punishment continue to undermine law and order throughout the developed world. .  Her father’s daughter, Giulia ran away from Pietro with her lover in 1792 and went to live in Paris among a circle of liberal and enlightened intellectuals.  Manzoni’s early life was lived in Lombardia–in Lecco (not...

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Guns ’n’ Liberals

How do liberals expect to grab our guns? That’s one thing they never explain when, after an incident like the shooting at the Texas church, they start calling for gun control. They’ll advance things like Dianne Feinstein’s 1994-2004 ban on “assault weapons” – which aren’t a real category, just a cosmetic description of mean-looking rifles. Her ban didn’t work anyway. Or they’ll call for a ban on gun sales at gun shows. Or registering all weapons. But the only thing that really would have an effect is something the gun controllers really want, but almost never mention: full confiscation. Liberals...

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Chesterton Conclusion–Go Back to Being Roman

But Rome endures in more places than the seven hills on the Tiber.  The civilization of Europe and its colonies is only an extension of the Roman world, from which we have never been really cut off. Where world- historians such as Spengler have seen ages and cycles severed from each other by cataclysmic events, Chesterton sees continuity. We do not understand, to be sure, the few monuments left by our distant neolithic ancestors; but the Greek gods have never died in that fashion; and the Roman empire has never died at all. Of the most modem industrial cities in...

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Properties of Blood II.1: The Family Castle, parts A and B revised (FREE)

Properties of Blood II, Chapter 1: The Family Castle It little profits that an idle king, By this still hearth, among these barren crags, Match’d with an aged wife, I mete and dole Unequal laws unto a savage race, That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not me. In Tennnyson’s poem, Ulysses, growing old on Ithaca, longs to resume his travels.  In the ancient legend, however, Ulysses—or, to give him his Greek name, Odysseus—was forced against his will to lead a life of adventure.  He fought in the greatest war his people ever heard of; he knew gods, befriended...

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Hellas: A Crisis That Is Absolutely Moral By Nikos Hidiroglou 

The nihilists, cosmopolitans and atheist bureaucrats (some of them called ironically “Christian Democrats”) that run European affairs have actually decided to destroy everything on the continent that gave birth to our civilization.  And they are ruining Hellas, the timeless source of light.  Since WWII they have subjugated, step by step, its political system, and now they are enslaving the country financially.  Hellas is sinking deeply into debt. Well, there are no political expectations right now for modern Hellenes.  Their choices are indeed limited. The urban political elite of the country is demonstrating in every chance it gets, the strange syndrome...

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Looking Back to Glory, Conclusion

For good or ill—or rather for good AND ill–Southern statesmen and political thinkers could not afford the comfortable illusions of Mr. Jefferson’s Declaration.  Calhoun admired Jefferson, but, exasperated by the assertion of natural equality, he lamented the inclusion of that one little phrase, “all men are created equal.” Before too long, Calhoun’s disciples—and his opponents—took up his insight and developed the argument.  James Henry Hammond, when reproached on the floor of the Senate, for defending the evil institution of slavery they had eliminated in the North, fired back, “the name but not the thing.”  George Fitzhugh went to the extreme of...

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Properties of Blood I.10: The Demands of Blood, Conclusion

Friendships come in different forms, for different motives, and with different levels of intensity.  Comrades in arms or in work may drift apart as soon as the war is over or the job finished.  Ritualized friendships, remade on the model of kinship, are more stable and anticipate the brotherhood of all faithful believers preached by the apostles. “Nothing gold can stay,” as Homer’s Glaucus understood all too well, and over the generations the bonds of kinship become fragile, evanescent.  The same process takes place in social evolution as law and contract replace the ties of blood and tradition, a point...

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Properties of Blood I.10: The Demands of Blood, Part F

From Kith to Kin to Commonwealth The commonwealth is a dynamic tension between the forces of love and the forces of hate, both of which have been planted in our human nature long before (whether in a temporal or hierarchical sense) we were human.  In many cases, however, the forces of love must be invoked in the service of hate.   To defend those we love, we may have to fight and kill their enemy. Kinship, as an expression of love, confers many benefits.  Its laws stipulate the people whom we may marry and who can inherit our property and...

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Nikos Doukas: Trump’s victory and Europe

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Trump’s victory came as a surprise in Europe, far more than in the US.  The major TV channels for months presented him as paranoid.  In a country like Greece, plagued by illegal immigration and targeted for centuries by Islamic expansionism, Trump’s views on these issues were presented as eccentric and extreme. Any discussion on the US elections ended with the conclusion that Trump will be crushed in the ballot and the World will continue its course towards the “progressive paradise.”   Particularly perverse was the spectacle of  leftist Greek (in other words White Christian) political analysts gleefully reveling in the crush that awaits...

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Writing and Reading Poetry, II: The Age of Lead

II Let’s start with the one piece submitted in response to my challenge.  This comes from my former managing editor, Kate Dalton Boyer, who is still harboring some dark feelings about her former boss’s sloppy office. Doggerel for TF I know a man named Thomas, his desk will give you pause. If one inquires the reason: “Tace!” he’ll say.  “Because.” Beneath a Mac his thesis (of Grecian poetry) is propping up his keyboard and in danger from his tea. The office door won’t open –review books in the way– it seems another forty-two have just arrived today. The lamp’s a...