Thomas Fleming

Thomas Fleming

Thomas Fleming is president of the Fleming Foundation. He is the author of six books, including The Morality of Everyday Life and The Politics of Human Nature, as well as many articles and columns for newspapers, magazines,and learned journals. He holds a Ph.D. in Classics from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and a B.A. in Greek from the College of Charleston. He served as editor of Chronicles: a Magazine of American Culture from 1984 to 2015 and president of The Rockford Institute from 1997-2014. In a previous life he taught classics at several colleges and served as a school headmaster in South Carolina

2

Born Out of Due Time, Chapter 11

“You are a sports hero.  Why not spruce the place up with publicity stills of you in the old days, signed pictures from great fighters?   You could install satellite TV with boxing matches, rassling, hockey, even football.  Everyone else has gambling machines.  You could make a thousand or two a month.”

“Sure, I’d increase business and make some money. Would you wanna come?”

0

More Poems: Shelley in Pisa

The sun is set; the swallows are asleep;
The bats are flitting fast in the gray air;
The slow soft toads out of damp corners creep,
And evening’s breath, wandering here and there
Over the quivering surface of the stream,
Wakes not one ripple from its summer dream.

1

Religio Philologi: The Creation of the Church, Part I

According to a later Christian tradition, when Tiberius heard of this strange Jewish renegade who alone did not want to kick the Romans out of Judaea, he proposed to the senate that Christ be included in the pantheon of Roman gods.  The Senate, so the story goes, objected, declaring the new religion to be illicit, though Judaism was protected by law. 

0

POB II, Chapter O, Part B

Whether Cicero’s statement [that the family is the seed-bed of the commonwealth] is true or not, political dreamers and social revolutionaries bent on destroying or transforming society have written and acted as if it were.  With only a few exceptions, every revolutionary political theory and social experiment of the past three hundred years has predicated itself on either the elimination of the family or on a drastic reduction of its traditional autonomy.

7

Properties of Blood, Volume II, Chapter 0: The Family and Its Enemies

The family was born free, everywhere it is in chains. This bogus quotation is a slight twist on the revolutionary declaration that Rousseau used to introduce The Social Contract: “Man is born free but is everywhere in chains.”  Rousseau was an original thinker who expressed himself in a brilliant prose style, but he was entirely wrong about many things and blind to the facts of human nature.  To a parent, or nurse, or anyone who has ever seen an infant up close, nothing seems clearer than the fact that man is born entirely dependent upon his mother without whom (or...

9

Antifa and AltRight

These criminal rioters are playing from the same script, but it was not written by George Soros–though he may have bought the current rights to it–but by the revolutionaries in 1848 and, more particularly, by the Communist terrorists of the 1920’s, who tried took over Hungary and tried to take over Germany and Italy.  If you want to understand how Mussolini–a comparatively benevolent despot–and the far from benevolent Hitler–came to power,  all you need to know is that it was facilitated by Leftist terrorism.

0

A League of Our Own, Part Two (Conclusion)

There are only two alternatives for this continental empire that has never been a real nation: Either we find the means to decentralize decision-making and restore authority to the old institutions of family and town and county (and even state), or else we lapse into a multifaceted civil war of blacks against Hispanics against whites against blacks against Jews…