Thomas Fleming

Thomas Fleming

Thomas Fleming is president of the Fleming Foundation. He is the author of six books, including The Morality of Everyday Life and The Politics of Human Nature, as well as many articles and columns for newspapers, magazines,and learned journals. He holds a Ph.D. in Classics from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and a B.A. in Greek from the College of Charleston. He served as editor of Chronicles: a Magazine of American Culture from 1984 to 2015 and president of The Rockford Institute from 1997-2014. In a previous life he taught classics at several colleges and served as a school headmaster in South Carolina

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Maurice Barrès and the Recovery of National Identity, II

In his novel Les déracinés (1897), Barrès chronicled the adventures of a group of boys at his own lycée in Nancy.  Their philosophy teacher, brilliant and ruthless, instills in them vast, almost Napoleonic ambitions to put their talents into the service of the ongoing revolutionary liberal tradition.  This is a late reflection of the tradition of Romantic heroism that usually ends disastrously in fiction.  Remember Julien Sorel?  Raskolnikov?   What happens to the boys in Paris is the subject of the novel.  Some become dissolute; others are reduced to poverty; but all begin to collaborate on a journal of the...

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The Jaundiced Eye, #2

White people in Detroit got angry when they discovered that, if they wanted to attend a rap concert, they would be charged more than persons of any other color.  Why am I not outraged?  I think any reasonable person would think the poor chumps should be fined and jailed for buying a ticket. The US Women’s Soccer Team is demanding Equal Pay.  I thought they were feminists.  Shouldn’t it be Equal Pay for Equal Play, in which case they should be playing against men’s teams.  Anyone remember Hank Junior’s line, “I’m not a soccer man, I’m an Oilers’ fan.”?  A...

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Fatal Mistakes, #2: It’s the Woman’s Right 

A girl at the age of twelve (or younger) may be physically mature enough to conceive a child, but is she intellectually or morally mature enough to think through an issue.  She is not allowed to drive or vote or sue in court or be convicted of murder as an adult.  Why?  Because, as nearly everyone with any intellectual maturity understands, children—male and female—are not well formed enough to be held entirely accountable for their actions. 

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Freedom

From the Christian and ethical perspective, however, freedom is essentially a moral and spiritual condition . Political and economic freedom, if it means simply that a man as the right to choose Burger King over MacDonald’s, Taylor Swift over Lady Gaga, or even a female over a male wife, amounts to very little