From Under the Rubble, Episode 4: Civil Disobedience

In this episode of From Under the Rubble, Dr. Thomas Fleming addresses something very much in the headlines these days: Civil Disobedience. Is it lawful and right? Host Stephen Heiner also asks our guest about the civil rights movement, while Dr. Fleming asks the larger question: what do we do in a civilized society when confronted with odious laws, dictates, and decrees?


Original Air Date: May 7, 2016
Show Run Time: 40 minutes
Show Guest(s): Dr. Thomas Fleming
Show Host(s): Stephen Heiner

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From Under the Rubble℗ is a Production of the Fleming Foundation. Copyright 2016. All Rights are Reserved.

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2 Responses

  1. Avatar James D. says:

    Dr. Fleming,

    Properly viewed, wasn’t (isn’t?) Alabama a sovereign republic with the right and duty to protect its citizens from subversion or a foreign invasion? The roving bands of marchers were incited by and funded by communists. The great majority were not local citizens and were simply paid agitators trained to maximize the effect for the complicit media. Why should the actual citizens have had to put up with interloping communists parading in their streets in an attempt to subvert their laws, overthrow their government, destroy their cities and focus the ire of the elites and media on them? Frankly, I think the agitators were dealt with pretty gently, especially if you consider what later happened in Chicago and Boston, or what would have happened had they tried that in any American city 25 or 50 years earlier. The really great injustice of the time was that the national guard wasn’t sent to clear the protesters and protect the citizens, but was instead sent as a communist vanguard.

  2. Avatar Patrick Kinnell says:

    St. Paul writes, “Remind them to be submissive to rulers and authorities, to be obedient, to be ready for any honest work, to speak evil of no one, to avoid quarreling, to be gentle and to show perfect courtesy toward all men. For we ourselves were once foolish, disobedient, led astray, slaves to various passions and pleasures…..I desire you to insist on these things, so that those who have believed in God may be careful to apply themselves to good deeds; these are excellent and profitable to men.” St. Paul’s letter to Titus