Stephen Heiner

Stephen Heiner

Stephen lives in Paris, where he writes and manages small businesses. He writes on culture, the permanent things, and all things French. You can find his writing online at Front Porch Republic, The Fleming Foundation, The American in Paris, and Medium. You can also chat with him on twitter or instagram: @stephenheiner. Stephen holds a BA in English Literature and minors in Catholic Studies and Business from Rockhurst University. He holds an MBA from Saint Louis University. He also served in the United States Marine Corps Reserve as a Nuclear Biological and Chemical Defense Specialist.

6

Winter Symposium in Sicily

It was roughly ten years ago that now editor of the Angelus Jim Vogel emailed me, “You have to come to Summer School in Rockford.  You need to meet Dr. Fleming.”  Jim had introduced me to Chronicles a year earlier and since I had recently resumed my undergraduate studies (dormant for seven years) I thought it would indeed be a great opportunity to make new friends, learn new things, and as Jim had noted, meet Dr. Fleming.  Scarcely could I have predicted the numerous places in America and Europe I would continue to learn from Dr. Fleming and other teachers...

1

The Yellow Vests Run Out of Gas

When asked to share my thoughts on the recent yellow vests protests, I initially demurred, stating that is was simply another case of the French being the French (about benefits) (about airbnb and/or uber) (about strikes in general).  The French also lack the resolve and ability to fix problems, as seen by the “we are not afraid” and “Je suis Charlie” sentiments now long since forgotten (thankfully).  But as I thought more on the matter, I realized that the Yellow Vests are simply a remake of an American film we’ve already seen (and forgotten): Occupy Wall Street. What Happened to Occupy? In September 2011, a...

1

Revisiting the Road to Serfdom

Friedrich Hayek’s 1944 The Road to Serfdom is firmly established as one of those books you’re supposed to read. But on the spectrum of works about economics, it probably falls more on the Wealth of Nations and Das Kapital side than on the Economics in One Lesson or even Freakonomics side. If its style and language appear somewhat dated, that’s because it was published in 1944. It is also focused on conditions to be found in prewar England and Germany, which takes the book into questions of not just economics but politics too. Yet Hayek’s book has stood the test of time, because its key messages are not constricted by...

5

Leisure is a necessity, not a luxury

I can still vividly recall my semester in Rome many years ago. Among the books we had brought to study that spring was Josef Pieper’s Leisure: The Basis of Culture. I had purchased the beautifully bound Liberty Fund edition (from which I’ll quote below) and couldn’t wait to plumb these two essays that Dr. Pieper had written in the aftermath of World War II, a time in which, it might easily be thought, leisure was the last thing on anyone’s mind. While I remember enjoying Leisure, his ideas were not aimed at (and thus did not then entirely take hold...

1

A Summary and a New Beginning

It was Twelfth Night this weekend, the end of the Christmas season for Christians who are too enthralled to restrict the celebration of the Incarnation to a single day preceded and followed by shopping, the modern form of worship.  Our happiness commenced at midnight December 25th and was only tempered as the Wise Men of the East brought their gifts to the King of Kings. So too does Season 1 of our podcast series finally end as well.  I am happy to admit on behalf of all the Foundation staff that we bit off more than we could chew last...

0

Transcripts

As Dr. Fleming has noted to you already, there have been some technological mishaps that prevented episode recording while he was in Italy.  We are back to recording this week and will get caught up, but we also wanted you to know about a benefit that is available to Charter Members for free and a la carte to those of other membership levels: transcripts. If you look at the drop down menu for podcasts on the main page you will see “Transcripts.”  Click there to find some selected transcripts to various episodes.  Charter Members receive one new transcript per month...

3

Podcasting: Season 1 commences

Some weeks ago we started to get our first annual renewals from those who were among the first to come along with us on our subscription-based website. Last year was a chance to experiment with different shows, formats, hosts, etc.  We’ve decided to up our game this year by adding two more shows every month, and by releasing all of our 2016 content, what we are dubbing as “Season Zero,” out into Soundcloud/ITunes/Google Play for the public to consume without needing to log into our site.  We feel that all of that content will be sufficient to pique the interest...

0

Planning vs. Reality

As they say, man proposes, God disposes. Some time back I announced what our podcast schedule would be for the remainder of 2016, only for it to be disrupted by some family health issues that Dr. Fleming had to attend to (which are still ongoing), and then the arrival of many of you in Rockford for our Boethius Seminar. As a result, we are spending the rest of August uploading the remainder of our stock of Boethius Book Club audios to continue to provide content to those paying members who so faithfully support our work. We will return to our...

1

The Alpine Heart

Liechtenstein is the 6th smallest country in the world, larger than San Marino but smaller than the Marshall Islands, and is roughly twice the size of the island of Manhattan.  The Principality is ruled by a stable royal family that is so popular that when in 2002 a referendum was put to the people to increase the executive power of the prince, including giving him the right to dissolve Parliament, it passed by a 64% margin. Snuggled in between Austria and Switzerland, it enjoys a prosperous existence, profiting from a close cooperation with the Swiss, whose money they use via a currency union....

7

Monday after Brexit: No one planned for this

It is the beginning of another work week in London, and all seems quite normal in the shops and on the high streets (though you might see some pictures like this one), despite the fact that a historic vote happened just a few days before.  What has become clear as the dust has settled is that no one planned for this outcome.  Remain had no Plan B in place, and shockingly, Leave had no Plan A.  The only thing that is clear this Monday after is that it is a very long way to Tipperary. David Cameron A visibly emotional PM who...