The Fleming Foundation Cultural Commentary

2

A Canticle for Leibowitz Part 1: Boethius Book Club, Episode 11

By

  A lively discussion of Walter Miller’s science fiction masterpiece, a future history in which mankind repeats the Dark Ages only to make the same mistakes again. Recorded: March 22, 2018 Original Air Date: May 2018 Show Run Time: 42 minutes Show Host(s): Dr. Thomas Fleming   Boethius Book Club℗ is a Production of the Fleming Foundation. Copyright 2018. All Rights are Reserved.

5

A Canticle for Leibowitz Part 2: Boethius Book Club, Episode 12

By

A lively discussion of Walter Miller’s science fiction masterpiece, a future history in which mankind repeats the Dark Ages only to make the same mistakes again. Recorded: March 22, 2018 Original Air Date: May 2018 Show Run Time: 42 minutes Show Host(s): Dr. Thomas Fleming   Boethius Book Club℗ is a Production of the Fleming Foundation. Copyright 2018. All Rights are Reserved.

1

Wednesday’s Child: Brownlow’s Razor, Part Two

In short, something like a late Romantic.  Had Pasternak been born in England, he would now be remembered as the culmination of Romanticism, a poet taking to modern extreme that “spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings” which, famously, Wordsworth mentions in the preface to Lyrical Ballads.  And politics, it would seem, had as little to do with any of this as automobile manufacturing or Olympic sports. Yet this was the same poet who, aged 41 in 1931, published an autobiography entitled Okhrannaya gramota, its title usually, and not incorrectly, translated into English as Safe Conduct.  In speaking of a man who,...

5

Leisure is a necessity, not a luxury

I can still vividly recall my semester in Rome many years ago. Among the books we had brought to study that spring was Josef Pieper’s Leisure: The Basis of Culture. I had purchased the beautifully bound Liberty Fund edition (from which I’ll quote below) and couldn’t wait to plumb these two essays that Dr. Pieper had written in the aftermath of World War II, a time in which, it might easily be thought, leisure was the last thing on anyone’s mind. While I remember enjoying Leisure, his ideas were not aimed at (and thus did not then entirely take hold...

4

Born out of Due Time, by Ched Rayson, Chapter III Complete

“Look, Smith.  I know you’re supposed to be a smart guy with a lot of insights, but until a few weeks ago, I was pretty happy.  I loved my wife: Hell, I liked her a lot.  I never thought much about minorities—my family brought me up Republican.  Now, all I can think of is Wounded Knee, the Little Big Horn, Chief Joseph.  It’s like someone’s being practicing voodoo.”

“You’ve never heard that the devil cannot enter your house without an invitation?”

“What’s that supposed to mean?”

1

Properties of Blood II.2: Ancient Marriage

This revised text is still a work in progress, but it is time to go on to clean up the chapters on husbands and wives, household defense, and parents and children before doing a final revision.   For decades we have been reading stories in the media about the crisis of the family: the decline in the number of young people getting married, the rise of illegitimacy, the increase in the rates of divorce, popular acceptance of adultery, and, most recently, leftist proposals to legitimate marriage between members of the same sex or the Republican alternative, which amounts to the...

1

Now Dems Take a Bead on the First Amendment

Having spent a month machine-gunning the Second Amendment “right to keep and bear arms,” now the Democratic Party is taking a bead on the First Amendment right to “freedom of the press.” The Party is suing President Trump, Russia and Wikileaks over the bogus Russian interference in the 2016 election. As I have written on Fleming Foundation from the start of this nonsense in late 2016, the Russians couldn’t possibly have influenced the election’s outcome because it’s too difficult to figure out how to do it, even for Americans, let alone Muscovites. President Trump can defend himself and the Russians...

1

Eating With Sinners, Conclusion

I think I first began to appreciate the problem presented by American individualism, when I had Thanksgiving dinner with a family of eccentrics.  They had little or no connection to the small community where their house was located–they had picked the town, decades earlier, by throwing a dart at the map, and most of them had long since scattered across the country.  They had picked their religions with almost the same insouciance: one was a Buddhist, another an atheist humanist, another (the only apparently sane member of the tribe) an Episcopalian, and another–a girl I had known in graduate school–a...